Tag Archives: Psalms

Guest Post

This past Sunday, my preacher Joe Genau was up for children’s sermon duty. He presented the most amazing connection between lectionary, kids, and what we call Rally Day—the day we all gather together during Sunday School to hear about the options for Sunday School and other missions during the year. Honestly, when I read the lectionary readings I thought for sure Joe would avoid Song of Solomon and the Psalm! His genius found a way! I think his idea of saying ‘a poem can be a present’ will fit with many other lectionary-ily difficult Sundays, and so I share it here as my first ever guest sermon post. Take note!

photo by Bill Woodruff. Chicago, 2015

photo by Bill Woodruff. Chicago, 2015

for August 30, 2015
14th Sunday after Pentecost
22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time
Proper 17
Year B
lectionary focus: Psalm 45:1-2, 6-9

Guest Post by:
Rev. Joe Genau

Edgewood Presbyterian Church (PCUSA)
Birmingham, AL

Good morning!

One of the Bible readings we’re going to hear this morning is a little strange.
It’s a poem that someone wrote for a King and a Princess on their wedding day!
And it’s not the kind of poem that rhymes – but it does use big, fancy, beautiful words.
It says things like “You two look wonderful!” and “I’m really excited for you!” and “God really loves you!”

Whoever wrote the poem was really happy for the King and the Princess on their very big, very special day. This person was so happy, that they wrote the poem to tell everyone at the wedding just how happy they were.

Did you know that you can give someone a gift like that? Instead of buying them a present for their special day – their birthday, or their wedding day, or their graduation day – you can write them a poem or a song or a story and tell them how happy you are and how excited you are and how much God loves them.

Well, today is a special day for Edgewood Presbyterian Church.
After worship, we’re going to go upstairs and have a party because it’s Rally Day!
Rally Day is the day we celebrate the beginning of a new Sunday School year.
When we go upstairs, you’re going to find out who your teachers are, and what you’re going to learn about this year.

I’m so excited about this special day that I wrote a poem for you – and I’d like to read it to you now:

Rally Day is here – I am so excited.
My heart is so happy to see you all.
You all look so nice in your dresses and shirts and cool shoes.
You’re all getting so big – it makes me feel old sometimes.
You’re all so smart – and you’ll learn even more this year.
About life. And about church. And about God.
God’s word is like a lamp, showing us the way to live.
We have such great teachers! God gave them wisdom to share.
Have fun in Sunday School. Listen and act kindly to each other.
And ask lots of questions!
Ask lots of questions!
Always, ask lots of questions!

That’s it! Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear God,
Thank you
For wise teachers
And for books to read
And for art
And for music
And for questions!
You love us.
We love you.
Amen.

Thanks for sharing Joe!
We are not Christians alone.
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.

Advertisements

Gathering Together

150712kidsfor Sunday, July 12, 2015
7th Sunday after Pentecost
15th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Proper 10
Year B
lectionary focus: 2 Samuel 6:1-5, 12b-19; Psalm 24

Welcome!

I love how joyfully you all come up to the chancel steps. Some of you run; some of you skip; and some of you walk…slowly…but you each come with intention and a smile. And I love how when I come into church each Sunday, Mr. Ray meets me at the door and gives me a big hug before he gives me the bulletin. When we gather for church and when we gather on the chancel steps, we meet each other in a joyful way. And our joy gives witness to our unity, that we are excited to all be God’s children together.

On our bulletin cover this morning, there is a picture of doors. Some of you guys drew these doors a few weeks ago with Miss Lindsey. This picture shows our church is a welcoming place, inviting the world to come and join us and be part of God’s family. This picture shows that nothing will keep us from opening the doors to let the people in.

In our Bible story today, King David calls for the people of Israel to come to God’s house. King David leads the people dancing through the town, joyfully celebrating the Glory of God. The people go dancing and singing and playing instruments and inviting everyone to join them as they process to God’s temple. King David calls for the church doors to be lifted and opened that all may gather to worship God.

So you see, for thousands of years, people have been getting together to worship God. And we make a big deal of gathering. We open the doors and come into the church excited to see our friends; curious to meet new visitors; thankful that God is with us. We come into church and celebrate being together as family to worship God who loves us each very much.

This past week our special word was #dance and we looked for ways that people were dancing. This week’s special word is #music. I bet you can think of lots of good pictures to go with music. I wonder what pictures Pastor Joe is taking on his vacation to go with music? So keep your eyes watching and get your parents to snap and post some pictures with our #epcvbs. And remember, lift up your heads and worship with joy. We are gathered to celebrate.

Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
Thank You
for doors that open.
Thank You
for our church family.
Thank You
for dance and music
and being together.
Us and You.
You love us.
We love You.
Amen

We are not Christians alone.
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.

Jesus is Here. Jesus Loves Us. It Will All Be Okay.

shepherdfor Sunday, May 11, 2014
4th Sunday of Easter
Good Shepherd Sunday
Graduation Sunday
Year A
lectionary focus: Psalm 23

Welcome!

Here is a story that Pastor Catherine told recently:
One day Pastor Catherine was at the grocery store. There she saw a mother with her baby daughter. The baby daughter was not happy; she was in the seat of the grocery cart crying at the top of her lungs. The mother was trying to shop as quickly as possible but the baby just kept crying and crying and crying. The mother was speaking very softly and saying beautiful words of comfort. “It’s okay Susie. I’m sorry you are so upset. It was not a good idea to stop at the store now, but in a few minutes this will be finished and then you can go home and have your favorite lunch and I’ll tuck you into bed for a nice nap. Don’t cry, Susie. I love you. I am here. It will all be okay.” And the mother just kept saying these soothing words over and over while the baby kept crying. When Pastor Catherine was leaving the grocery store, she saw the mother loading the groceries into the car and putting her baby into the carseat. Pastor Catherine went over to the young mother and said, “Excuse me, I just want to say what a good job you are doing. You were speaking so lovingly while your daughter was so upset. You are a great mother to Susie.” The young mother stopped and looked kind of puzzled and then said, “Oh. My daughter is Janet. I am Susie. I was saying the words I know Jesus would say to comfort me.”

Today is a day of many celebrations. Today we are still celebrating Easter…because the mystery and joy of Easter are too big to celebrate on just one Sunday; and I’m sure you know that we are celebrating Mother’s Day because you already have been making your mother feel special; and we are celebrating our friends who are graduating from high school and going forth into the world in a new way. And in addition to celebrating Easter and Mother’s Day and Graduation Day, our Bible story today is the 23rd Psalm, the Lord is My Shepherd, so the church calls today Good Shepherd Sunday.

Now most of us may not know any actual shepherds, but we know that sheep need a shepherd. Sheep trust the shepherd to care for them. Sheep trust the shepherd to stay with them and lead them. Through good weather and bad weather. Through good pastures and not so good pastures. Through safety and danger. Wherever they are, whatever they are doing, sheep trust their shepherd to continue always to care for them and be with them.

Pastor Catherine’s funny story about the mother in the grocery store reminds us that each of us trusts Jesus to comfort us. Like sheep trusting the shepherd to care for them, we too trust Jesus to care for each of us. No matter who we are, or where we are, or what we are doing, Jesus is with us. As mommies and daddies and children, as family and friends, as students and workers, as God’s Easter people, we trust Jesus will always be with us in good moments and bad, in the excitement of special days and the slowness of boring days, in the times of comfort and in the times of fear. The Lord is our shepherd. Jesus is here. Jesus loves us. It will all be okay. And we go forth trusting Jesus to continue to be with us, to lead us, to comfort us now and always. There is nothing that can separate us from the love of God.

Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
Thank You
for celebrations.
Thank You
for Your love.
Thank You
for always being with me.
Amen

We are not Christians alone.
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.

Lenten Series: Your Going Out, Your Coming In, Your Socks (Almsgiving)

bootsandsocksfor Sunday, March 16, 2014
2nd Sunday in Lent
Year A
lectionary focus: Psalm 121
note 1: This is part of our Lenten Series on Almsgiving. I originally thought I would use the lectionary from John for this sermon, but changed my mind to use the Psalm.
note 2: Have a basket to collect the socks.
note 3: Have cups (we are going to use red plastic cups) to pass out for next week’s almsgiving: collecting coins in cups for Living Waters of the World.

Look at all of the socks you have brought! Our basket is so full! Thank you! Thank you!

When we think of Bible stories, we don’t often think of socks. I think that most of the people back then wore sandals without socks. But in today’s story, we read from the book of Psalms. In verse one, we hear, “I lift up my eyes to the hills–from where will my help come?” I think you know the answer to the Psalmist’s question. In verse eight, we hear, “The Lord will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and forevermore.” In this Psalm and throughout the Bible, we hear how God guides our feet, always here to help us, always here to love us, always here to walk with us.

For the past many weeks, Pastor Catherine has had a hard time walking with her broken foot. Yes, her “boot” is really cool looking, much like an astronaut’s boot. And her scooter is even cooler, more like a toy than a tool. But Catherine has confessed to me that we don’t really think much about our feet until they hurt or they don’t work right. She is not able to go running or hiking or even to walk the dog! And you’ve seen how she has a hard time on the chancel steps. Catherine is getting a good lesson in an old saying, “Your feet are your friends.”

In my family, we like to do lots of walking and so to remind the people in our family that we love them, we like to give socks as presents. When we give each other really nice, comfy, sturdy, good socks, we are saying, “Hey, I want your feet to feel good. I want your feet to be strong and healthy so that you can walk well and do the things God calls you to do.”

Today you have brought socks: nice, comfy, sturdy, good socks. And this afternoon, Mr. Bill and I will take these socks to the First Light Shelter. The guests are at the Shelter because they need help; they are having a hard time in their lives. Through your gift, they will know that you want their feet to feel good; they will know that you want them to walk boldly and strongly and comfortably; they will know that God loves them because you have shared with them. Your almsgiving this week will help meet their need in a loving way. Thank you for sharing God’s love this way.

To prepare for next week’s almsgiving, I am going to give each of you a cup today. Our Bible story next week is about water. Now I’m not asking you to bring your cup back full of water…that would be silly…but I am asking that you bring your cup back full of coins! You will see next week how your cup of coins can help meet others’ need for water.

Will you say a prayer with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
Thank You
for my feet.
Thank You
for walking with me.
Please bless these socks
as we share them with others
so they will know
our love
and Your love
and they will walk
boldly and strongly and comfortably
with You.
Amen

We are not Christians alone,
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.

Gathering Advent 2013

AChristmasfor Advent and Christmas Eve 2013
Year A

It is time to gather Advent! This post contains five children’s sermons: one for each Sunday in Advent and one for Christmas Eve (or Day).* My church uses the children’s time to light the Advent Wreath candles. But this year, my Advent/Christmas sermon series goes beyond lighting the candles by having the children also assemble the crèche week by week. We will stage our medium-sized, tabletop, durable yet lovely, crèche in the front of the sanctuary near the Advent candles. We are still discussing the exact details of placement as we want it viewable by all, yet easily accessible by the children.

Here is my outline–which you can certainly adjust to fit your children, crèche, and worship style:
1st Sunday, December 1: The Candle of Home/The Stable: Psalm 122:1-9; Isaiah 2:1-5
2nd Sunday, December 8: The Candle of Community/The Cattle: Isaiah 11:1-10
3rd Sunday, December 15: The Candle of Joy/The figure of Mary: Luke 1:47-55
4th Sunday, December 22: The Candle of Faith/The figure of Joseph: Matthew 1:18-25
Christmas Eve, Tuesday, December 24 or Christmas Day, Wednesday, December 25: The Christ Candle/The Angels, the Shepherds, the sheep, and the figure of Jesus: Luke 2:1-20 or John 1:1-14

The full sermons are below. I am still fine tuning them, but as time is getting close, I wanted to go ahead and post. Please forgive typos (or better yet, let me know!) and check back each week to see if I’ve done any improvement editing.

In addition to using these sermons, you can modify this handout Gathering Advent for your members to use at home as they gather Advent. It is a Word document; honestly, I’m not sure how it will open on your computer! If you have problems please email me (chancelsteps  @ gmail dot com). Once you open it, add your Church’s name, and share with your congregation; feel free to edit as needed but please retain my web address at the bottom of the pages as the source. Also note, the two added verses for Away in a Manger…courtesy of my friends Jill Stewart, Lynn Dorough, and Susan Windham. (They are blessed with poetic talents!)

So, from here, seek out an appropriate crèche and invite your church children to gather Advent and prepare for the great mystery of Christmas.

May you gather home, community, joy, and faith this Advent Season,
Frances

*You can find two other Advent/Christmas sermon series in this blog: traditional here and different here.

*************************

Astable1st Sunday, December 1, 2013
The Candle of Home
The Stable
lectionary focus: Psalm 122:1-9; Isaiah 2:1-5

Welcome to Advent!

Today we start the Season of Advent. During this time, we spend four weeks preparing ourselves for the great mystery of Christmas. Each of the four Sundays during Advent we will light another candle on the wreath. And this year, as the candles help us move closer to Christmas, we will also add to our crèche, which is the church word for manger scene.

Our Bible story today calls us to think about the House of the Lord. Usually those words make us think about the church. But during Advent, we think about where Jesus was born. He was not born in a hospital or a fancy castle or even a house. Jesus was born in a stable because there was no room in the inn. A stable is a barn; it’s where animals sleep. A stable is not where people stay. But this is the message: Jesus is at home everywhere. Certainly, if He can be at home in a lowly stable, then He can be at home here in our church; He can be at home in our houses; He can be at home in the Shelter downtown; and He can be at home in our hearts.

Today we will begin our crèche by placing the stable. As you each get to hold it and pass it around, notice how simple it looks and how strong it feels. And now Zachary will place it on our table.

Today we also light the First Candle in our Advent Wreath. People have different names for the different candles. We will call this First Candle, the Candle of Home. With our stable and our candle, we remember that Jesus is at home everywhere, and we are at home in the love of Jesus. While Zachary now lights the First Candle, the Candle of Home, will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
We place the stable
and light this candle
on the First Sunday in Advent
to remind ourselves
to prepare our hearts
as loving homes
for the coming Christ Child.
Amen

And now Miss Amanda will lead us all in singing the first verse of Away in a Manger.
(Away in a manger, No crib for His bed. The little Lord Jesus laid down His sweet head. The stars in the bright sky looked down where He lay. The little Lord Jesus asleep on the hay.)

May you be at Home in this Advent Season.

*

Aanimals2nd Sunday, December 8, 2013
The Candle of Community
The Cattle
lectionary focus: Isaiah 11:1-10

Welcome to the Second Sunday in Advent!

Last Sunday, we lit the First Candle, the Candle of Home. We also placed the stable, Jesus’s first home, in our crèche. We thought about the House of the Lord and how Jesus is at home everywhere…and we are home with the love of Jesus.

Our Bible story today is an Old Testament prophecy describing the Advent of the Lord. We hear that when He comes, the wolf will live with the lamb, and the leopard with the goat, and the young cows and the lions and the bears and the snakes will all be friends and eat together. Nowwwww, we know lots of these animals aren’t really friends. Most often, if they eat together…it’s because one is eating the other. But again, this is the message: with Jesus, all kinds of people can be friends. People who act differently and think differently and look differently can sit and eat together at Jesus’s Holy table. Jesus invites us to live together in this one world, invites us to live together in a peaceful Community.

Last Sunday, we placed the stable. And what would be a stable without animals? As you each get to hold and pass around the cows and sheep and goats, think about all the different kinds of people that make up the community of our church, the community of our neighborhoods, the community of our world. And now Miles and Theo will place the animals in the stable.

Today we light the Second Candle in Advent. We call this Candle, the Candle of Community. With our stable and our animals and our two candles, we remember that Jesus is our home and He is the foundation of peace in our communities near, far, and everywhere. While Miles and Theo light the two candles, will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
We add the animals to the stable
and light this candle
on the Second Sunday in Advent
to remind ourselves
to prepare with peaceful Community
for the coming Christ Child.
Amen

And now Miss Amanda will lead us all in singing the second verse of Away in a Manger.
(The cattle are lowing; the Baby awakes. But little Lord Jesus no crying He makes. I love Thee, Lord Jesus look down from the sky and stay by my side ‘til morning is nigh.)

May you be in Community this Advent Season.

**

AMary3rd Sunday, December 15, 2013
The Candle of Joy
The figure of Mary
lectionary focus: Luke 1:47-55

Welcome!

Today is the Third Sunday in Advent. On the first Sunday, we lit the Candle of Home and placed the stable in our crèche. Last Sunday, we lit the Candle of Community and placed the animals in the stable. We have talked about Home and Community and how Jesus is at home everywhere and He calls us at to be at home throughout communities around the world.

Our Bible story today is the beautiful song of Mary, Jesus’s mother. When the Angel comes to tell Mary that she will be the mother of Jesus…which honestly is kind of an overwhelming announcement…what a big job!…Mary says, Behold I am the handmaid of the Lord! Mary means, Yes! She is overjoyed to do this big job! And she sings a hymn of praise and thanksgiving. Be sure to listen later in the service when the choir sings this song…and feel the joy that Mary tells…the joy of being with Jesus.

This Sunday, we add the figure of Mary to our crèche. As you each get to hold her and pass her around, look at how the artist that created this figure painted her face to captured her feeling of joy. And now Liza will place the figure of Mary in our crèche.

Today we light the Third Candle in Advent. We call this Candle, the Candle of Joy. We think of Mary’s joy; we think of our joy; we think of the Joy of the Word…the Joy that is coming…the Joy that is Jesus. And now Liza will light the three candles: the Candle of Home, the Candle of Community, and the Candle of Joy. Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
We joyfully add Mary
and light this candle
on the Third Sunday in Advent
to remind ourselves
to prepare with Yes!
to prepare with Joy
for the coming Christ Child.
Amen

And now Miss Amanda will lead us all in singing the another verse of Away in a Manger.
(His mother, dear Mary, looks down as He sleeps. Her Yes to the angel, a promise she keeps. She treasures this moment, her heart full of joy. She’s holding God’s Son, her sweet baby boy.)

May you find Joy in this Advent Season.

***

Ajoseph4th Sunday, December 22, 2013
The Candle of Faith
The figure of Joseph
lectionary focus: Matthew 1:18-25

Welcome!

Today is the Fourth Sunday in Advent. Today is the final Sunday in the Season of Advent. We began the Season by lighting the Candle of Home and placing the stable in our crèche. We then added the animals to the stable and lit the Second Candle of Advent, the Candle of Community. Last Sunday, we placed the figure of Mary and lit the Candle of Joy. We have gathered a loving home, a peaceful community, and joy for the world.

This Sunday, our Bible story introduces us to Joseph. Joseph has the important roles of being Mary’s husband and being Jesus’s daddy here on earth. Last week, we noted that when Mary heard the news about being Jesus’s mother, she sang a song of YES! But this week, we hear Joseph honestly admit his fear of having such a big job. But an angel tells him Fear not! that God has chosen him for this job. And so Joseph boldly steps out in faith to take on this awesome responsibility.

We now add the figure of Joseph to our crèche. As you each get to hold him and pass him around, think about his courage, his willingness, his faith to do what God called him to do. And now Kia will place the figure of Joseph in our crèche.

Today we light the Fourth Candle in Advent. We call this Candle, the Candle of Faith. We remember Joseph and his faith; we envision our faith, ready to do what God calls us to do. And now Kia will light the four candles: the Candle of Home, the Candle of Community, the Candle of Joy, and the Candle of Faith. Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
We boldly place Joseph
and light this candle
on the Fourth Sunday in Advent
to remind ourselves
to prepare with Faith
for the coming Christ Child.
Amen

And now Miss Amanda will lead us all in singing another verse of Away in a Manger.
(As Joseph considers the problems they face, He surely is frightened and seeking God’s grace. The angel says ‘Fear not, the Child is foretold!’ So faithfully Joseph goes forth strong and bold.)

May you be strengthened with Faith in this Advent Season.

****

Christmas Eve, Tuesday, December 24, 2013
or Christmas Day, Wednesday, December 25, 2013
The Christ Candle
The Angels, the Shepherds, the sheep, and the figure of Jesus
lectionary focus: Luke 2:1-20 or John 1:1-14

Here we are.
The Season of Advent is over. The Season of Christmas begins tonight.
We have spent the past four weeks lighting candles and assembling our crèche. Finn will now re-light the four blue Advent candles. We started with the Candle of Home and placed our stable. We then lit the Candle of Community and added the animals to our crèche. On the Third Sunday, we joyfully sang with Mary, adding her figure to the crèche and lighting the Candle of Joy. And this past Sunday, we listened as Joseph overcome his fear by faith, and we placed the figure of Joseph boldly beside Mary in the crèche and lit the Candle of Faith. But not all of our candles are lit and our crèche is not complete.

Tonight our Bible story gives us the glorious details of what happened on that night long ago in Bethlehem. Jesus is born!  Mary, still joyful, wraps him in a blanket and lays him in a manger. Just over the hill, shepherds watching their flocks are greeted by angels bringing good news of great joy. The shepherds and the sheep come with haste to meet Baby Jesus. And all are amazed.

We, too, are once again amazed by the story of Jesus. Tonight we fill our crèche with sheep and shepherds and angels and the Baby Jesus. As you each get to hold the figures and pass them around, consider how you fit into the story of Jesus. Over the Advent Season, as we assembled our crèche, we gathered stories of faith and joy and community and home. Our crèche reminds us that we are part of these stories, too. We fit into these stories, too. Jesus was born in a stable because there was no room in the inn. But we always have room in our hearts. Our hearts can be filled with faith and joy and community and home and Jesus. With Jesus there is always room. And now will you each find room for your figure in the crèche?

Finn will now light the Christ Candle. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it. Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
We fill the crèche.
We light the Christ Candle.
Jesus is born.
There is always room.
Amen

And now Miss Amanda will lead us in singing the final verse of Away in a Manger.
(Be near me, Lord Jesus, I ask Thee to stay close by me forever and love me, I pray. Bless all the dear children in Thy tender care and fit us for heaven to live with Thee there.)

We are not Christians alone.
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.

In Shops or At Tea

saintsfor Sunday, November 3, 2013
All Saints Sunday
lectionary focus: Psalm 149:1-9; Ephesians 1:11-23; Luke 6:20-31
prop: a hymnal that includes I Sing a Song of the Saints of God
Find more history on this hymn here and an interesting survey results here.

Welcome!

Today I have another important book that we use in worship. This is our Hymnal. In here, we find the hymns, or songs, we sing as a congregation. Today we are singing one of these hymns that has been around for a long time and that is traditionally sung on this Sunday each year. The hymn is I Sing a Song of the Saints of God. Let me tell you the story of this hymn: Almost one hundred years ago, a woman named Mrs. Scott who lived in England wrote some songs for her young children to teach them about God. With this song, Mrs. Scott wanted her children to know that Saints are not just fancy people who have statues in churches; Saints are just regular folk like you and me. Eventually Mrs. Scott’s hymns were published in a little book and that book found its way to a man who lived in the United States; John Hopkins wrote a new tune for this hymn and it was added to the collection of hymns sung by many churches.

But back to the words…if Saints are just regular people, why are they called Saints? Saints are everyday sort of people who spend their lives doing good for God. Everything that a Saint does is for God. Whether they are being a preacher sharing the Good News, or a doctor helping the sick, or a waiter serving in a restaurant, or a gardener cutting the grass, Saints love God and share God’s love by doing what God has called them to do. This hymn reminds us that whatever we do, we, too, can be Saints.

So why do we sing this hymn on this day? Today is All Saints Sunday. Today we remember those people in our church family who died in the past year. We are sad that they have died, but we are blessed and rejoice that we knew them and received God’s love from them. We remember that they are Saints by all the good things they did. And we work to follow their example. I remember Miss Betty sharing her violin music and her stories of all the places she played. I remember Buddy helping fix things around the church…and at anybody’s house who had something broken! I remember Mr. Mike; he was so nice and sweet and friendly yet somehow he was the best King Herod we ever had in the Christmas pageant! I remember Cookie always ready for a game of catch whenever you guys showed up with a ball.

Our hymnal has many songs in it. And at one time, some people thought I Sing a Song of the Saints of God was too common and being a ‘children’s hymn’ not appropriate for our Hymnal…but fortunately, other people knew that is the point! We are ALL blessed children of God…and as His children, we, too can be Saints today, tomorrow, every day.

So listen today as We Sing A Song of the Saints of God, and hear how Saints are just regular folk who love God and love to share God’s love. Listen how there were Saints long ago but there are Saints today…you can meet them in school, in shops, any where!

Will you say a prayer with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
Today we sing a song of Your Saints.
We are thankful
for the Saints we have known.
Please help me
to be a Saint too.
Amen

We are not Christians (or Saints) alone.
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.

Giggling with God

IMG_0759for Sunday, April 21, 2013
4th Sunday of Easter
Good Shepherd Sunday
Earth Sabbath
Year C
lectionary focus: Psalm 23
(for a good grown-up sermon see: Sheep Are Stupid by Rob Brink)

Happy Easter! Happy Earth Day! Happy Good Shepherd Sunday! Wow! Today is a busy day on our calendar. So many things to celebrate…we are still in the Season of Easter rejoicing in the joy and mystery of Easter; tomorrow is Earth Day and the world honors the beauty and wonder of God’s planet; and today our Bible story is Psalm 23, glorifying The Lord is our shepherd; we have all that we need. Celebrating all of this joy and mystery and beauty and love just makes me…giggle.

When I lived in North Carolina, our neighbor had sheep. Sheep are soft and dainty, and when they say baaaa, they stick out their tongues and look so cute! But honestly, for being so precious, sheep are not very smart. Nope. Sheep can’t find always find their way back to the barn. If one sheep starts running just for fun, the others all panic and start running with fear. And sometimes they forget to get out of the rain and their wool gets so soaked that it is way heavy. Sheep can very easily get confused and lost and be stubborn and mean and worry and do things that hurt themselves! Without a shepherd to watch over them, sheep would have a very tough time.

And so our Bible story, one of the most popular and well-known, Psalm 23…with its opening words, says “The Lord is my shepherd” which means I am like a sheep! This verse makes me giggle because I often do behave like a sheep! I can very easily get confused and lost and be stubborn and mean and worry and do things that hurt myself. But God is my Shepherd. God is our Shepherd. God leads us and looks after us and loves us. Because honestly, even though we are not always very smart, God thinks we are just precious. And I think God giggles about us being sheep, too.

So the next time you find yourself a bit confused or worried or angry, stop and realize that you are being a sheep. Then look to God the Good Shepherd and ask Him what you are supposed to do. You are a precious child of God, and God, like a Good Shepherd, loves to be with you and to watch over you and is always ready to help you.

Will you pray with me? (This is an echo prayer: the leader says a line and the children repeat it.)

Dear Lord,
You are my Shepherd.
Help me
when I act like a sheep.
Thank You
for watching over me.
Amen

We are not Christians alone.
My mission is to share, inspire, and encourage.